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2 edition of nature of cognitive representations for familiar and unfamiliar faces found in the catalog.

nature of cognitive representations for familiar and unfamiliar faces

Amy Louise Siegenthaler

nature of cognitive representations for familiar and unfamiliar faces

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These findings indicate that the cognitive mechanism that mediates the perception of faces is adapted for associating different exemplars of the same face together, but is unable to integrate exemplars of two different faces. The general discussion (Chapter Five) focuses on implications of these findings for theories of face perception and recognition.This research examined the nature of the cognitive representations mediating perception, priming, and explicit memory for faces. Explicit tests of memory involve an intent to recollect information from a prior episode. With implicit tests of memory, however, there is no intent to recollect but rather memory is revealed indirectly through performance facilitation on tasks that do not require reference to a prior episode.Priming for new associations was examined using three different types of pairs: unfamiliar different-person (Chapter Two), unfamiliar same-person (Chapter Three), and familiar same-person (Chapter Four). Same-person pairs consisted of different exemplars of the same-individual; different-person pairs consisted of pictures of two different individuals. All types of pairs were encoded under either deep (e.g., honesty or friendship judgments) or shallow (e.g., picture shading or left-right judgments) instructions. Following encoding, both implicit and explicit memory were assessed with accuracy and reaction time measures. Associative memory was measured by comparing test performance between intact and recombined pairs; intact pairs consisted of two faces paired together both at study and test whereas recombined pairs consisted of faces seen during study that were re-paired with other previously-studied faces. Item memory was measured by comparing test performance between intact and new pairs; new pairs were composed of either one new and one previously-seen face or two new faces.Consistent with previous research with verbal stimuli, explicit memory for faces was generally best for intact versus recombined pairs and following deep versus shallow encoding. Implicit memory test performance revealed strong and reliable associative priming effects but only for unfamiliar same-person pairs (i.e., two different images of the same unfamiliar person) and only following deep encoding instructions (Chapter Three). Reliable item priming effects were obtained with unfamiliar same-person and familiar same-person pairs, but not with unfamiliar different-person pairs.

The Physical Object
Pagination99 leaves.
Number of Pages99
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20338984M
ISBN 100612916448

the Frame Problems: Cognitive Representations are Not Encodings Mark H. Bickhard Introduction We all believe an unbounded number of things about the way the world is and about the way the world works. For example, I believe that if I move this book into the other room, it will not change color — unless there is a paint shower on the way, unless I. Both of the two experiments had the same results, which showed that there are two ways to form unfamiliar facial attractiveness: (1) the first one is that generalization effect occurred after halo effect, compared with negative familiar faces, positive familiar faces were evaluated more attractive, so did the unfamiliar faces that were familiar. Humans have a natural expertise in recognizing faces. However, the nature of the interaction between this critical visual biological skill and memory is yet unclear. Here, we had the unique opportunity to test two individuals who have had exceptional success in the World Memory Championships, including several world records in face-name association by: Epstein, R.A., Higgins, J.S., Jablonski, K., & Feiler, A.M. (). Visual scene processing in familiar and unfamiliar environments. Journal of Neurophysiology, Visual scene processing in familiar and unfamiliar environments Humans and animals use information obtained from the local visual scene to orient themselves in the wider.


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nature of cognitive representations for familiar and unfamiliar faces by Amy Louise Siegenthaler Download PDF EPUB FB2

These differences in how we cope with within-person variability in familiar and unfamiliar faces have been attributed to the nature of different representations available for familiar and. The face is quite an important stimulus category for human and nonhuman primates in their social lives.

Recent advances in comparative-cognitive research clearly indicate that chimpanzees and Cited by: 9. of familiar faces as representations of the real individuals in the way that chimpanzees and humans do.

In a follow-up study with the same individuals, subjects correctly identified one. Research on face recognition, such as distinguishing between faces and non-faces, and between familiar faces and unfamiliar or new faces, implicates the Cited by: Handbook of Categorization in Cognitive Science, Second Edition presents the study of categories and the process of categorization as viewed through the lens of the founding disciplines of the cognitive sciences, and how the study of categorization has long been at the core of each of these disciplines.

Chapter 1 – Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience. Cognitive Neuroscience - Aims to explain cognitive processes in terms of brain based mechanisms - A bridging discipline between cognitive science and cognitive psychology - Driven by methodological advances (functional neuroimaging) enabling the study of the human brain safely in the laboratory o structural imaging.

Face Perception. Face perception is a critical aspect of social perception: the inability to recognize faces and the emotional and social cues in faces is a central deficit in some disorders of social cognition, which will be discussed later in the chapter. From: Fundamentals of Cognitive Neuroscience (Second Edition), Related terms.

Further analysis showed that oxytocin selectively improved the discrimination of new and familiar faces — participants with oxytocin were less likely to mistakenly characterize unfamiliar faces as familiar. [] Rimmele, U., Hediger K., Heinrichs M., & Klaver P.

Oxytocin Makes a Face in Memory Familiar. Neurosci. 29(1), 38 - As such, recognition of familiar and unfamiliar faces can take place.

Eysenck & Keane () suggest that recognition of familiar faces principally involves structural encoding, face recognition, personal information and naming, whilst recognition of unfamiliar faces involves encoding, expression and facial speech analysis, and direct visual.

The pioneering study by Gallup [] has been at the origin of a now very large literature on MSR in sum up, that literature confirms that some primates species can use their reflection in a mirror for self-exploration (for a review, see []), but claims that MSR abilities strongly depends on the species under the one hand, MSR has been demonstrated in the four Author: Parron Carole.

The suggestion that the defect in the recognition of familiar people in these patients may be due to disruption of the FRUs stems from the fact that the infero‐anterior parts of the temporal lobes constitute the most rostral portion of the ventral stream of visual processing, which plays a crucial role in visual by:   There is overwhelming evidence that the processing of upright faces differ from other types of stimuli— including inverted faces— since it involves fine-grained holistic representations: the multiple parts of an individual face are perceived as integrated, or as a single unit, rather than as separate representations [44, 45, 80–83].

Our Cited by:   Describe and evaluate Bruce and Young's model of face recognition (8+16marks) Bruce young’s model of face recognition starts with structural encoding, where the face is seen and the features are analysed. The model then splits up into separate compartments one for familiar faces and the other for unfamiliar faces.

[AO1] The first of these compartments. A straightforward way of thinking about perception is in terms of perceptual tion is the construction of perceptual representations that represent the world correctly or incorrectly.

This way of thinking about perception has been questioned recently by those who deny that there are perceptual representations. This article examines some. The function of a social representation, by making the unfamiliar familiar (Moscovici, ), is to protect the symbolic integrity of a group’s worldview, a worldview often threatened by expert discourse.

Social representations thus frame unfamiliar events in more familiar terms. (, p. 22) distinguished between two basic interpretive by: Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews, 2(1), Roark, D., O’Toole, A.

& Abdi, H. “Human recognition of familiar and unfamiliar people in naturalistic video,” Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop on Analysis and Modeling of Faces and Gestures, International Conference on Computer Vision, Nice, France.

The effect on a cognitive process (for example, perception) of the information surrounding the target object or event. Sometimes called "expectation effect" because the context is thought to set up certain expectations in the mind of the cognitive processor.

Ex: it is easier to recognize a fork in the kitchen than in your bedroom. While the Face recognition test of unfamiliar faces examines novel face processing, this task measures the ability to recognize known (famous) faces. Recognition of familiar faces is assessed with pictures of 30 celebrities' faces intermixed with 10 unfamiliar face foils.

The faces are presented individually in a pseudo-random order. Differential responses to famous or familiar faces in the FFA have been confounded by the task and/or attentional demands (Sergent et al; Kim et al; Leveroni et al).

When the cognitive task was held constant, we found no effect of fame on the fusiform face activation (Gorno-Tempini et al). Similarly, the effect of fame on Cited by: Effects of photographic negation and the difficulty of recognising line-drawings suggest that the representations mediating human face recognition are based upon image-features rather than on more abstract derived measurements of face features.

Inversion and configuration of faces. Cognitive Psychology, 25, F. & Brace, V. ( Cited by: The study of human visual object recognition has a relatively short and somewhat controversial history.

My interest in how experience shapes both object representations and the processes applied to such representations has involved me in two spirited debates concerning: i) how we recognize objects across changes in viewpoint or other sources of variation; and, ii) the.

There is one brain area, however, that looms so large in the domain of memory, that we'll spend a while focusing on it. This is the hippocampus, which seems to be particularly good at rapidly learning new information, in a way that doesn't interfere too much with previously learned information (Figure Figure ).When you need to remember the name associated with a.

Cognitive psychology assumes we are just like computers and that we process informa- tion using input, storage and retrieval processes. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY6 definition Experimental cognitive psychology Places an experimental emphasis on cognitive psychology. Brown (Cognitive)Part 11/21/ PM Page 6 Visual object recognition refers to the ability to identify the objects in view based on visual input.

One important signature of visual object recognition is "object invariance", or the ability to identify objects across changes in the detailed context in which objects are viewed, including changes in illumination, object pose, and background context.

Differential sensitivity for viewpoint between familiar and unfamiliar faces in human visual cortex Ewbank, M. & Andrews, T. J., 1 May Article in Neuroimage. Familiar vs. Unfamiliar faces/processing Bruce & Youngs Model (Gold Standard) involves: structural encoding, expression analysis, facial speech analysis, directed visual processing, face recognition units, person identity nodes, name generation, & cognitive system; Understanding facial recognition (how we process) Familiar v.

Identification and ratings of caricatures: implication for mental representations of faces. Identification of familiar and unfamiliar faces from internal and external features: some implications for theories of face recognition. Infants' recognition memory for faces.

Influences of familiarity on the processing of Author: Lesley Bonner. The function of a social representation, by making the unfamiliar familiar (Moscovici, ), is to protect the symbolic integrity of a group’s worldview, a worldview often threatened by expert discourse.

Social representations thus frame unfamiliar events in more familiar terms. (, p. 22) distinguished between two basic interpretive by: B, Nicholas Blauch, Computational insights into human expertise for familiar and unfamiliar face recognition. B, Yuki Fujishima, Early Emotional Face Processing Deficits in Schizophrenia: a MEG Study.

B, Matthew Harrison, Serial processing of. The differences in the sets are summarized in Figure properties are critical between the two sets. First, note that in order to identify successfully each object by distinguishing it from the others in the set (i.e., when P(object) = ), the CS set requires the conjunction of shape and color information, whereas the S set only requires shape by: 7.

Although commentators periodically declare that Freud is dead, his repeated burials lie on shaky grounds. Critics typically attack an archaic version of psychodynamic theory that most clinicians similarly consider obsolete. Central to contemporary psychodynamic theory is a series of propositions about (a) unconscious cognitive, affective, and motivational processes; (b) Cited by: Table 1: The four levels/modes of processing.

Figures 3, 4, and 5 show how within the processing model, cognition depends upon context. The effectiveness of the contribution of processing activities at each of these levels / modes, depends on the cognitive requirements posed by the specific context.

Structure. The FFA is located in the ventral stream on the ventral surface of the temporal lobe on the lateral side of the fusiform is lateral to the parahippocampal place displays some lateralization, usually being larger in the right hemisphere.

The FFA was discovered and continues to be investigated in humans using positron emission tomography (PET) and. We investigated how the difficulty of detecting a shape change influenced the achievement of object constancy across depth rotations for object identification and categorization tasks.

In three sequential matching experiments, people saw pictures of morphs between two everyday, nameable objects (e.g., bath—sink morphs, along a continuum between “bath” and “sink” end Cited by: 9.

The absence of identity recognition, accompanied by a lack of SCR, stimulates the patient to explore unfamiliar faces, and identity recognition of familiar faces leads to a more detailed exploration in the eye region, and it results in gaze avoidance of the eye region.

Vision is important in accessing reserved knowledge in the etiology of : Aslı Enzel Koc, Cicek Hocaoglu. This paper covers all of that ground far too quickly, and it never engages with debates that are currently raging in the cognitive sciences (e.g., issues of representational format, the nature of distributed representations, and the nature of the 'minimal' representations required to sustain reinforcement learning).

The Neural Representation Of Personally Familiar And Unfamiliar Faces In The Distributed System For Face Perception. Task-invariant brain responses to the social value of faces. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 23, DOI: Fine structure in representations of faces and objects.

Nature Neuroscience, 9,   Faces and voices include rich information about characteristics of unfamiliar people. Usually, faces and voices are perceived simultaneously and integrated.

People sometimes feel a discrepancy between an unfamiliar face and his/her voice. This discrepancy may arise because impressions formed from the face and the voice are less similar.

Human Nature Review 3 () sense of the depth and potential for enhancing understanding by studying (for example) corti-cal asymmetry. His leverage is provided by work on disorders that lead to impaired recog-nition of faces (prosopagnosia) or melodies (amusia).

In both cases, unfamiliar experienceFile Size: KB. Participants saw pairs of faces and were asked to make a same/different judgement, after which they were asked to predict how well other people, unfamiliar with these faces, would perform. In four experiments we show different groups of participants familiar and unfamiliar faces, manipulating this in different ways: celebrities in experiments 1.

The discussion will be motivated both by results from the literature on aesthetics and considerations about the nature of mental representations from cognitive science.

According to the literature reviewed above, beauty has to do with the relation of an object to its parts and the relations among its parts, as encoded by a human by: Create representations of familiar objects and scenes using play materials, language, scribbles and other actions.

Make up simple nonsense songs, sign, chant, and move to music (twirl around and fall down, “march” by lifting knees high). Talk or sing to themselves for comfort or enjoyment and express ideas and feelings through music and.This chapter offers a breezy introduction to the content question, the question of what determines the content of a mental representation.

Existing approaches are outlined: informational semantics, inferential role semantics, correspondence theories, ascriptionism and the intentional stance, and teleosemantics. This discussion highlights the major issues that the book’s positive account .